WRC

Riverside Community College Name __________________________________

Writing and Reading Center

Directed Learning Activity M.11 Date ___________________________________

 

Improving Fiction Quoting Skills I .

Purpose: Upon completion of this activity, students will know the basic rules for quoting short stories and novels.

This DLA should take approximately 30 minutes to complete.

 

The Basic Anatomy of a Quotation While his former reservation classmates “look back toward tradition,” Victor says, “I try to remain stoic

for the photographers as I look toward the future” (34).  period goes here

  direct quotation end quote mark page #

Rule # 1: Do not quote simply to quote or fill up your essay. A quotation should be used only if it is striking or because the idea is too complicated to paraphrase. Rule #2: All direct and indirect quotations need a name/attribution tag in the sentence. A direct quotation is the speaker’s (character, narrator, or writer) exact words. An indirect quotation, or paraphrase, is the speaker’s thoughts but put into your own words, sentence construction, and cited. If you are focusing on only one short story or novel in your essay and indicate the writer in the introduction, you do not need to put the writer’s last name in the ( ) since there are no other writers. However, if you have multiple works, you need to indicate the last name in ( ). Direct quotation:

 The narrator tells readers about Mrs. Mallard’s state of mind regarding her husband by saying, “And yet she had loved him—sometimes. Often she had not” (21).

After his experience with the coach, Victor says, “Sharing dark skin doesn’t necessarily make two men

brothers” (34).  character

Indirect quotation:

After his experience with the coach, Victor realizes that just because two people might share a history of discrimination, it does not mean that there will be more empathy (34).

the writer’s idea but your words and sentence construction

EQ: How do I quote short stories and novels?

Speaker comma

 

 

 

Riverside Community College Name __________________________________

Writing and Reading Center

Directed Learning Activity M.11 Date ___________________________________

 

You can put the name tag at the beginning or end of the quotation. If there is a dependant clause or independent clauses, you can also put the name tag in the middle. Name tag verbs should be in the present tense: asks, says, argues, explains, etc.

Victor relates that it “felt good, that ball in my hands, all those possibilities and angles. It was mathematics, geometry. It was beautiful” (33). “[I]t felt good, that ball in my hands, all those possibilities and angles. It was mathematics, geometry. It was beautiful,” Victor relates (33).

“[I]t felt good, that ball in my hands, all those possibilities and angles,” Victor relates. “It was

mathematics, geometry. It was beautiful” (33).   note punctuation placement Rule #3: Use a colon when you introduce a quotation with a full sentence.

In the sixth grade I too learned what Victor discovers: “Sharing dark skin doesn’t necessarily make two

men brothers” (34).  Rule #4: When you use the word that to set up a quotation, do not use a comma.

 Victor cannot take the bullying any longer and punches Frenchy, explaining that “the little warrior in me roared to life that day” (32).

Rule #5: When you would like to use a quotation but not the whole quotation, use the ellipsis. These three spaced periods tell your readers that you took out some information in the middle of the quotation. However, the quotation must remain grammatically correct and in context; you may not use the ellipsis to change the meaning of the quotation. If you skip a whole sentence or more, add a fourth period to the ellipsis to signify this. Original

“But it felt good, that ball in my hands, all those possibilities and angles. It was mathematics, geometry. It was beautiful,” relates Victor (33).

With ellipsis

“But it [the basketball] felt good, . . . all those possibilities and angles. It was mathematics, geometry. It was beautiful,” relates Victor (33). “But it felt good, that ball in my hands. . . . It was beautiful,” relates Victor (34).

 Use a fourth period to indicate an omitted sentence.

 

 

Riverside Community College Name __________________________________

Writing and Reading Center

Directed Learning Activity M.11 Date ___________________________________

 

Rule #6: Keep in mind that readers typically do not have the story to look at, so if a word or term would be unclear to them, clarify it in the quotation. Use brackets [ ] to insert a word or words to clarify a direct quotation. You can also use the brackets when you need to uppercase or lowercase a letter or change a word to make the quotation grammatically correct.

 “But it [the basketball] felt good, . . . all those possibilities and angles. It was mathematics, geometry. It was beautiful,” relates Victor (33).

 “[I]t felt good, that ball in my hands, all those possibilities and angles. It was mathematics, geometry. It was beautiful,” Victor relates (33).

Rule #7: If you want to quote something that has quotation marks in it, use the single quotation marks.

Victor explains how it feels to be put down for his heritage by his teacher: “She said it [Indian] without capitalization. She called me ‘indian, indian, indian’” (33).

  Rule #8: Quotations over four typed lines must be blocked (indent ten spaces, omit quotation marks, put the final period before the citation, no additional line breaks before or after the block indented section). * Examples used come from “The Story of an Hour” by Kate Chopin and “Indian Education” by Sherman Alexie.

Go on to the next page for the activity

 

 

 

Riverside Community College Name __________________________________

Writing and Reading Center

Directed Learning Activity M.11 Date ___________________________________

 

STEP 1: Read the excerpt below, and answer the questions that follow. Feel free to highlight the material.

Excerpt from “The Yellow Wallpaper” by Charlotte Perkins Gilman, page 123 There is one marked peculiarity about this paper, a thing nobody seems to notice by myself, and that is that it changes as the light changes. When the sun shoots in through the east window—I always watch for that first long, straight ray—it changes so quickly that I never can quite believe it. That is why I watch it always. By moonlight—the moon shines in all night when there is a moon—I wouldn’t know it was the same paper. At night in any kind of light, in twilight, candlelight, lamplight, and worse of all by moonlight, it becomes bars! The outside pattern I mean, and the woman behind it is as plain as can be. I didn’t realize for a long time what the thing was that showed behind, that dim sub-pattern, but now I am quite sure it is a woman. By daylight she is subdued, quiet. I fancy it is the pattern that keeps her so still. It is so puzzling. It keeps me quiet by the hour. I lie down ever so much now. John says it is good for me, and to sleep all I can. Indeed he started the habit by making me lie down for an hour after each meal. It is a very bad habit I am convinced, for you see I don’t sleep. And that cultivates deceit, for I don’t tell them I’m awake—O no! The fact is I am getting a little afraid of John. He seems very queer sometimes, and even Jennie has an inexplicable look. It strikes me occasionally, just as a scientific hypothesis,–that perhaps it is the paper! I have watched John when he did not know I was looking, and come into the room suddenly on the most innocent excuses, and I’ve caught him several times looking at the paper! And Jennie too. I caught Jennie with her hand on it once. She didn’t know I was in the room, and when I asked her in a quiet, a very quiet voice, with the most restrained manner possible, what she was doing with the paper—she turned around as if she had been caught stealing, and looked quite angry—asked me why I should frighten her so! Then she said that the paper stained everything it touched, that she had found yellow smooches on all my clothes and John’s, and she wished we would be more careful! Did not that sound innocent? But I know she was studying that pattern, and I am determined that nobody shall find it out but myself!

STEP 2: Using the information you just read about quoting rules, indicate whether the material taken from the

article is quoted/cited correctly or not. If the quotation/citation is correct, write C. If it has an error, write E, and either fix the error or write a brief explanation of the error. Note also the rule that is or is not being followed. 1. ____ “The fact is I am getting a little afraid of John” (123). Rule # ____

 

 

Riverside Community College Name __________________________________

Writing and Reading Center

Directed Learning Activity M.11 Date ___________________________________

 

2. ____ The narrator says of the seemingly changing wallpaper, “By moonlight . . . I wouldn’t know it was the same paper” (123).

Rule # ____ 3. ____ The narrator continues, “That is why I watch it [the wallpaper] always” (123). Rule # ____ 4. ____ It appears that the narrator’s strange behavior regarding the wallpaper is causing her husband

to wonder about the wallpaper as well: “I have watched John when he did not know I was looking, and I’ve caught him several times looking at the paper!” (123).

Rule # ____ 5. ____ The narrator’s state of mind appears to be deteriorating when she says that, “I am quite sure it

is a woman” behind the wallpaper’s pattern (123). Rule # ____ STEP 3: Take your finished activity to a WRC tutor or instructor on duty, go over your answers, and make whatever changes are necessary. Be sure you can answer the EQ (essential question) above. Ask the tutor or instructor to fill in the section below. _____________________________ ____________________________ ______________ Tutor’s or instructor’s name tutor’s or instructor’s signature date