Speech Hw 5

Read the Chapter only do not use out sources. do the following

What are the two most important concepts in this chapter?

Describe the concepts as if you were explaining them to a friend.

How will you use the concepts in the class or in your personal or professional life?

you must use the terms from the text and write at least 150 words. one page

Chapter 5 Adapting to Audiences

SPEAK

© 2011 Cengage Learning

This chapter describes the issues of audience adaptation, including demonstrating the relevance of your topic, acknowledging initial audience disposition toward your topic, establishing common ground, gaining credibility, ensuring information comprehension and retention, and managing language and cultural differences.

5/27/2014 12:21 PM

© 2007 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. Microsoft, Windows, Windows Vista and other product names are or may be registered trademarks and/or trademarks in the U.S. and/or other countries.

The information herein is for informational purposes only and represents the current view of Microsoft Corporation as of the date of this presentation. Because Microsoft must respond to changing market conditions, it should not be interpreted to be a commitment on the part of Microsoft, and Microsoft cannot guarantee the accuracy of any information provided after the date of this presentation. MICROSOFT MAKES NO WARRANTIES, EXPRESS, IMPLIED OR STATUTORY, AS TO THE INFORMATION IN THIS PRESENTATION.

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The mind is

© 2011 Cengage Learning

Your purpose is to make your audience see what you saw, hear what you heard, feel what you felt. Relevant detail, couched in concrete, colorful language, is the best way to recreate the incident as it happened and to picture it for the audience.

~Dale Carnegie

Learning Outcomes:

1. Why is it important to articulate the relevance of your speech to your audience?

2. What should you do if your audience does not share your attitude about the topic of your speech?

3. What can you do to help your audience see you as trustworthy and knowledgeable about your topic?

4. Why is it important to address diverse learning styles in your speech?

5. What can you do to overcome language and cultural differences between you and your audience?

5/27/2014 12:21 PM

© 2007 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. Microsoft, Windows, Windows Vista and other product names are or may be registered trademarks and/or trademarks in the U.S. and/or other countries.

The information herein is for informational purposes only and represents the current view of Microsoft Corporation as of the date of this presentation. Because Microsoft must respond to changing market conditions, it should not be interpreted to be a commitment on the part of Microsoft, and Microsoft cannot guarantee the accuracy of any information provided after the date of this presentation. MICROSOFT MAKES NO WARRANTIES, EXPRESS, IMPLIED OR STATUTORY, AS TO THE INFORMATION IN THIS PRESENTATION.

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Audience Adaptation Is…

the process of tailoring your speech’s information to the needs, interests, and expectations of your listeners.

© 2011 Cengage Learning

Your concerns about adapting to your audience will inform your research efforts, your choice of main points, the supporting material that you will use to develop those points, and even the jokes you might want to tell. So recognizing audience adaptation needs lays the foundation for the work that follows.

Action Step 2 Understand Your Audience and Adapt to It:

Understand audience diversity.

Understand audience initial interest and attitude.

Adjust content to be appropriate for your audience.

Determine how you will establish your credibility with the audience.

5/27/2014 12:21 PM

© 2007 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. Microsoft, Windows, Windows Vista and other product names are or may be registered trademarks and/or trademarks in the U.S. and/or other countries.

The information herein is for informational purposes only and represents the current view of Microsoft Corporation as of the date of this presentation. Because Microsoft must respond to changing market conditions, it should not be interpreted to be a commitment on the part of Microsoft, and Microsoft cannot guarantee the accuracy of any information provided after the date of this presentation. MICROSOFT MAKES NO WARRANTIES, EXPRESS, IMPLIED OR STATUTORY, AS TO THE INFORMATION IN THIS PRESENTATION.

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Relevance & Topic

© 2011 Cengage Learning

Adapt information in your speech so it is

relevant to listeners.

Demonstrate that your information

Is timeless

Has proximity

Has personal impact

Information has timeliness when it is useful now or in the near future. You can increase the relevance of the information you present by showing how it is timely for a particular audience

Listeners are more likely to be interested in information that has proximity, a relationship to their personal “space.”

When you present information on a topic that can have a serious physical, economic, or psychological impact on audience members, they will be interested in what you have to say

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Initial Audience Topics

Initial audience disposition is the knowledge of and opinions about your topic that your listeners have before you speak.

© 2011 Cengage Learning

Speakers need to understand the importance of adapting to listeners’ attitudes no matter what type of speech they are giving. Audience adaptation is obviously important for persuasive speeches, but it is also necessary for informative speeches.

During speech preparation, choose specific supporting material with these initial attitudes in mind.

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Common Ground

© 2011 Cengage Learning

To establish common ground (shared

backgrounds/experiences) with an

audience, use these adaptation techniques:

Personal pronouns

Rhetorical questions

Common experiences

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Credibility

© 2011 Cengage Learning

Three adaptation techniques can affect an audience’s confidence in the speaker, or credibility:

Demonstrating knowledge and expertise

Establishing trustworthiness

Displaying personableness

The impact of credibility on speaker success has been a fundamental concept in public speaking since Aristotle described it as ethos more than 2,000 years ago.

When listeners perceive you to be a knowledgeable expert, they will perceive you as credible. Their assessment of your knowledge and expertise depends on how well you convince them that you are qualified to speak on the topic.

Your trustworthiness is the extent to which the audience can believe that what you say is accurate, true, and in their best interests. The more your audience sees you as trustworthy, the more credible you will be.

Personableness is the extent to which you project an agreeable or pleasing personality. The more your listeners like you, the more likely they are to believe what you tell them.

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Exhibit 5.1 Kolb’s Cycle of Learning

© 2011 Cengage Learning

You need to adapt the information you present so that audience members can easily follow what you are saying and remember it when you are through. These guidelines can help you.

For example: a learning style is a person’s preferred way of receiving information. Because people differ in how they prefer to learn, you should present your ideas in ways that make it easy for all audience members to understand and remember what you are saying.

Similarly, when listeners become confused or forget basic information, they lose interest in what is being said. If your speech is more than a couple of minutes long, you can use transitions to orient your audience. A transition is a sentence or two that summarizes one main point and introduces the next one.

Using specific yet vivid language, personalizing the information you present, and comparing new ideas with ones the audience already understands can also help listeners remember what you are saying.

Information Comprehension & Retention

Guidelines for Adapting Information to Help Audiences Understand and Remember

Appeal to diverse learning styles.

Orient the audience with transitions.

Choose specific and familiar language.

Use vivid language and examples.

Personalize information.

Compare unfamiliar ideas with those the audience recognizes.

One prominent model for understanding learning styles, called Kolb’s cycle of learning, conceptualizes learning preferences along four dimensions: feeling, thinking, watching, and doing.

Exhibit 5.1 depicts how the watching–doing and feeling–thinking dimensions of the cycle of learning theory result in four types of learners.

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Language & Cultural Differences

© 2011 Cengage Learning

When you address listeners from ethnic and language groups different from your own, be sure to…

…work to be understood when speaking in your second language.

…show respect for your audience by choosing culturally appropriate supporting material.

You can help your audience by speaking more slowly and articulating as clearly as you can. By slowing your speaking rate, you give yourself additional time to pronounce difficult words.

In addition, when you are speaking to audiences who are different from you, you may need to conduct additional research to find statistics, examples, and other supporting material that will be meaningful to the audience. Or you may need to elaborate on ideas that would be self-explanatory in your own culture.

Forming a Specific Plan of Audience Adaptation: An audience adaptation plan should answer these questions:

How relevant will the audience find this material?

What is my audience’s initial disposition toward my speech topic likely to be?

What common ground do audience members share with one another and with me?

What can I do to enhance my credibility?

How can I make it easier for listeners to comprehend and remember the information I will share?

What language or cultural differences do audience members have with one another and with me?

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© 2011 Cengage Learning

There are three things to aim at in public speaking: first, to get into your subject, then to get your subject into yourself, and lastly, to get your subject into the heart of your audience

~ Alexander Gregg

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