SPEECH CH 7

Read the Chapter only do not use out sources. do the following

What are the two most important concepts in this chapter?

Describe the concepts as if you were explaining them to a friend.

How will you use the concepts in the class or in your personal or professional life?

you must use the terms from the text and write at least 150 words

Chapter 7 Organizing and Outlining the Speech Body

SPEAK

© 2011 Cengage Learning

This chapter focuses on developing the body of your speech by describing how to: (1) identify main points that are implied in the specific goal statement and write them into a thesis statement for the speech; (2) organize the body of your speech; and (3) create transitions that move the speech smoothly from one main point to the next.

5/27/2014 3:38 PM

© 2007 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. Microsoft, Windows, Windows Vista and other product names are or may be registered trademarks and/or trademarks in the U.S. and/or other countries.

The information herein is for informational purposes only and represents the current view of Microsoft Corporation as of the date of this presentation. Because Microsoft must respond to changing market conditions, it should not be interpreted to be a commitment on the part of Microsoft, and Microsoft cannot guarantee the accuracy of any information provided after the date of this presentation. MICROSOFT MAKES NO WARRANTIES, EXPRESS, IMPLIED OR STATUTORY, AS TO THE INFORMATION IN THIS PRESENTATION.

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The mind is

© 2011 Cengage Learning

Organizing is what you do before you do something, so that when you do it, it is not all mixed up.

~A.A. Milne

Learning Outcomes

1. Why is it important to limit your speech to two to four main points?

2. Why should you conduct a clear thesis statement?

3. How might you arrange your points in your speech?

4. What are some types of supporting material you can use to elaborate your main points?

5. Why are transitions important?

5/27/2014 3:38 PM

© 2007 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. Microsoft, Windows, Windows Vista and other product names are or may be registered trademarks and/or trademarks in the U.S. and/or other countries.

The information herein is for informational purposes only and represents the current view of Microsoft Corporation as of the date of this presentation. Because Microsoft must respond to changing market conditions, it should not be interpreted to be a commitment on the part of Microsoft, and Microsoft cannot guarantee the accuracy of any information provided after the date of this presentation. MICROSOFT MAKES NO WARRANTIES, EXPRESS, IMPLIED OR STATUTORY, AS TO THE INFORMATION IN THIS PRESENTATION.

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Identify Main Points

The main points of a speech are complete sentence statements of two to four central ideas the audience needs to understand.

To identify main points:

List all ideas that relate to your speech goal

Delete and combine ideas as needed

From remaining ideas, select two to four to use as main points in your speech

© 2011 Cengage Learning

With some speech goals, identifying the main points is easy. Usually, though, you will need to do some further work to identify the main points that audience members need to understand if you are to achieve your speech goal.

Identify these main ideas first by listing the all the ideas you have found that relate to your specific goal. Then eliminate ideas that your audience analysis suggests this audience already understands.

Check to see if some of the ideas can be grouped together under a broader theme, and eliminate any ideas that might be too complicated or too broad for this audience to understand. Finally, from the ideas that remain, choose two to four that are the most important for your audience to understand if you are to accomplish your specific speech goal.

Action Step 4 Organize and Develop Ideas into a Well-Structured Outline

Identify 2-4 main points.

Write a thesis statement with main point preview.

Develop your main points.

Outline the speech body.

5/27/2014 3:38 PM

© 2007 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. Microsoft, Windows, Windows Vista and other product names are or may be registered trademarks and/or trademarks in the U.S. and/or other countries.

The information herein is for informational purposes only and represents the current view of Microsoft Corporation as of the date of this presentation. Because Microsoft must respond to changing market conditions, it should not be interpreted to be a commitment on the part of Microsoft, and Microsoft cannot guarantee the accuracy of any information provided after the date of this presentation. MICROSOFT MAKES NO WARRANTIES, EXPRESS, IMPLIED OR STATUTORY, AS TO THE INFORMATION IN THIS PRESENTATION.

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Write a Thesis Statement

© 2011 Cengage Learning

A thesis statement is a one or two sentence summary of your speech that incorporates your general and specific goals and previews the main points of the speech.

A thesis statement is a blueprint from which you will organize the body of your speech.

You will write your thesis statement on your speech outline. You will also use it as a basis for the transition from the introduction to the body of your speech.

Exhibit 7.1 page 88 give sample speech goals & thesis statements (This exhibit provides several examples of specific speech goals and thesis statements).

All speeches will have 3 important elements:

General goal

Specific goal

Thesis statement

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Outline the Body of the Speech

A speech outline is a sentence representation of the hierarchical and sequential relationships among the ideas presented in the speech.

© 2011 Cengage Learning

You can think of a speech outline as a diagram that organizes the information you will present.

An outline may have three hierarchical levels of information: main points (noted by the use of Roman numerals: I, II, III, . . .), subpoints that support a main point (noted by the use of capital letters: A, B, C, . . .), and sometimes sub-subpoints to support subpoints (noted by Arabic numerals: 1, 2, 3, . . .).

You will want to write your main points and subpoints in complete sentences, to clarify the relationship between main points and subpoints.

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General Form for a Speech Outline

I. Main point one

A. Subpoint A for main point one

1. Sub-subpoint one

a. Elaboration material (if needed)

b. Elaboration material (if needed)

2. Sub-subpoint two

a. Elaboration material (if needed)

b. Elaboration material (if needed)

B. Subpoint B for main point one

1. Sub-subpoint one

a. Elaboration material (if needed)

b. Elaboration material (if needed)

2. Sub-subpoint two

a. Elaboration material (if needed)

b. Elaboration material (if needed)

© 2011 Cengage Learning

This exhibit shows the general form of how a formal speech outline system looks.

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General Form for a Speech Outline

© 2011 Cengage Learning

II. Main point two

A. Subpoint A for main point two

1. Sub-subpoint one

a. Elaboration material (if needed)

b. Elaboration material (if needed)

2. Sub-subpoint two

a. Elaboration material (if needed)

b. Elaboration material (if needed)

B. Subpoint B for main point two

1. Sub-subpoint one

a. Elaboration material (if needed)

b. Elaboration material (if needed)

2. Sub-subpoint two

a. Elaboration material (if needed)

b. Elaboration material (if needed)

This exhibit shows the general form of how a formal speech outline system looks.

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Outlining Main Points

© 2011 Cengage Learning

Word main points correctly

Clearly specify relationships between each main point statement & the goal statement

Ensure that the main points are parallel in structure

Select an organizational pattern

Time, narrative, topic or logical reasons order

It is important to write main points, subpoints, and sub-subpoints as complete sentences. Only complete sentences can fully express the relationship among the main points and subpoints, and between each main point and the specific speech goal. Main points should also be written in parallel structure—their wording should follow the same structural pattern.

Once you have worded each main point, you will choose an organizing pattern. Time order organizes your main points in a chronological sequence or by steps in a process. Narrative order conveys your ideas through a story or series of stories. Topic order organizes the main points of the speech by categories or divisions of a subject. Logical reasons order organizes the main points by the reasons that support the specific speech goal.

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Outlining Subpoints

© 2011 Cengage Learning

Identify subpoints by sorting research cards into piles that correspond to each of your main points.

Outline subpoints in full sentences.

Make sure that one sub-point is a listener relevance link—a statement alerting listeners about how the point relates to them.

A main point may have two, three, or even more subpoints depending on the complexity of the main point. Subpoints should also be represented on the outline in full sentences. Be sure to also include internal references for items of information you found in secondary sources.

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List Supporting Material

© 2011 Cengage Learning

A good outline also includes short outline statements of supporting material -developmental material that will be used in the speech.

Supporting material includes such elements as personal experiences, examples, illustrations, anecdotes, statistics, and quotations. Choose these items to meet the needs of your specific audience.

Include internal citations and develop a reference list as you go along. Doing so will help you remember what research to cite and when during your speech to enhance your credibility and to demonstrate ethical communication behavior by avoiding plagiarism

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Create Transitions

© 2011 Cengage Learning

Transitions are words, phrases, or sentences that show the relationship between two ideas:

Section transitions

Signposts

You can think of section transitions as the glue that holds your macrostructure together, and signposts as the glue that holds your subpoints and supporting material together within each main point.

Transitions are words, phrases, or sentences that show the relationship between two ideas:

Section transitions bridge the major parts of the speech.

Signposts are words or phrases that connect pieces of supporting material to the main point or subpoint they address.

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© 2011 Cengage Learning

Success is a journey, not a destination. The doing is often more important than the outcome.

~Arthur Ashe

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