Prevention Pressure Injury In Patient On Admission

Implementing Evidence-Based Pressure Injury Prevention Interventions: Veterans Health Administration Quality Improvement Collaborative.

Authors:

Zubkoff, Lisa  Neily, Julia  McCoy-Jones, Shantia  Soncrant, Christina  Yinong Young-Xu  Boar, Shoshana  Mills, Peter

Affiliation:

VA National Center for Patient Safety, White River Junction, Vermont Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, New Hampshire Pressure Injury Prevention & Management FAC, Central Office, Washington, District of Columbia

Source:

Journal of Nursing Care Quality  (J NURS CARE QUAL), Jul-Sep2021; 36(3): 249-256. (8p)

Publication Type:

Article – research, tables/charts

Language:

English

Major Subjects:

Pressure Ulcer  —  Prevention  and Control Medical Practice, Evidence-Based Veterans Quality Improvement Nursing  Care Quality of Health Care  —  Evaluation Collaboration

Minor Subjects:

Human  Emollients  —  Therapeutic Use  Skin Care  Patient Handling  —  Methods  Outcome Assessment  Descriptive Statistics  Retrospective Design

Abstract:

Background: Pressure injury prevention is a persistent concern in nursing. The Veterans Health Administration implemented a creative approach with successful outcomes across the United States. Problem: Pressure injury prevention is a measure of nursing quality of care and a high priority in the Veterans Health Administration. Methods: A 12-month Virtual Breakthrough Series Collaborative utilizing coaching and group calls was conducted to assist long-term and acute care teams with preventing pressure injuries. Interventions: Interventions from the Veterans Health Administration Skin Bundle were implemented, including pressure-relieving surfaces, novel turning techniques, specialized dressings, and emollients to prevent skin breakdown. Results: The aggregated pressure injury rate for all teams decreased from Prework to the Action phase from 1.0 to 0.8 per 1000 bed days of care (P = .01). The aggregated pressure injury rates for long-term care units decreased from Prework to Continuous Improvement from 0.8 to 0.4 per 1000 bed days of care (P = .021). Conclusion: The Virtual Breakthrough Series helped reduce pressure injuries.

Journal Subset:

Core NursingNursing; Peer Reviewed; USA

ISSN:

1057-3631

MEDLINE Info:

NLM UID: 9200672

Entry Date:

20210602

Revision Date:

20210602

DOI:

10.1097/NCQ.0000000000000512 

Accession Number:

150544232