Social Work With Groups And Community Essay

Archdiocese Of Catholic Charities Of Miami (Latino Immigrant Children)

Student’s Name: Rudy Hernandez

Institutional Affiliation: University Ana G Mendez

Introduction

The Archdiocese of Miami is one of the catholic charities.

The mission of the charities is to honor God by enhancing human life and dignity, supporting individuals and families, building communities, and working for justice.

The Catholic Charities was incorporated in 1931

The charity recognizes Latino immigrant children as one of the most vulnerable individuals and works to help them as a way of transforming the society for the better.

The geographic areas served are Miami-Dade, Broward, and Monroe Counties.

For Latino Immigrant children, the charity provides s a safe, healthy and nurturing environment for them with the goal of school readiness and comprehensive social services for daily.

History and information of the organization

The charity organization began on march 8, 1931

The foundation was fro answering the call to help those in need after the Great Miami Hurricane and the Great Depression that left many families in Miami impoverished.

The vision at the time was to come together to plan the best strategy to take so that those in need would be able to et the help needed,, a practice the agency still upholds today.

The focus at the time of the foundation was t identify family problems, out-of-wedlock pregnancies, juveniles delinquency, immigrants threatened with depression, and children needing foster care.

Miami-Dade was the first emergency shelter for homeless men in key west

For Broward County, it meant to meet Hispanic elderly needs and their families.

Latino immigrant children

The number of Latino immigrant children has expanded rapidly with factors affecting their health multiple and interlinked.

The children are often considered at increased risk of maltreatment because of stress, and pressure experienced by the family resulting from immigration and acculturation.

Despite the rapid growth of the immigrant population over the last years, particularly the Latinos, the wellbeing of children is greatly affected.

There are significant obstacle experience by many immigrants, but Latino immigrant children demonstrate considerable resilience, the capacity to survive physically, and psychologically in circumstances requiring strengths and determination.

The Catholic charities, therefore, are in place to help the children as they are the most vulnerable individuals among the immigrants f the United States.

Indicators of oppression

Deleterious effects of discrimination on health and mental health of the children

Children maltreatment because of stress and pressure experienced by the family because of immigration and acculturation

Racial discrimination because of being minorities in the United States

Inequality on concerns f the children’s wellbeing

Physical violence ad threats

Sexism

Classism

Anti-Semitism

Ableism

Heterosexism

 

Ways that oppression is perpetuated

Ethnic-social socialization- to enable the growing children recognize and cope with discrimination

Promotion for mistrust

Egalitarianism

Preparation for bias

Anti-oppressive social work

Advocating for social justice

Ways to work for social justice and social inclusion

Consideration-incorporating the immigrants needs in the policy making process

Equal rights-access to basic services such as education, housing, social services and health care

Community participation-access to social interactions and participation in cultural, social, and political activities

Equality of opportunity and participation of all people

Respecting diversity

Empowerment-having a voice in the society, the tolls to participate in social life, and access to employment

Organize, lead and educate others to stand with the immigrants and demand change

Precursors

Catholic Charities of Archdiocese of Miami works to address the systemic causes of poverty and build communities

The catholic charity partners with United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, the Catholic Campaign for Human Development, Catholic Relief Services, and local community organization to help the immigrant children achieve self-sufficiency.

The relief services for the Latino immigrant children include:

Educational campaigns

Legislative advocacy on international development initiatives

Empower low-income people to help themselves, stand in solidarity with them, and educate the children about unjust structures

Group strategies

Affirming the inherent dignity bestowed on every human person including immigrants and refugees, no matter the circumstance that compel a person to begin a new life in the community through:

Citizenship education

Community outreach and education

Immigration legal services

Affordable housing

Immigration advocacy

Leadership development and catholic identity

Advocacy and social policy initiatives

Purpose and social role

The charity advocates for policies that uphold human dignity and promote integral human development

The policies aim at creating policies which assist and support the children immigrants.

Developing social enterprise business models and building community alliances to encourage innovation and job growth

The aim is to gain economic self-sufficiency and stability in the areas of housing and income, while decreasing immigrant’s reliance on government benefits.

Support immigrants ineligible for publicly funded series and cannot afford to pay for health insurance or care

Offering shelter, health-care, legal services and pastoral accompaniment to migrant laborers and their families

Teaching on natural rights, human dignity and responsibilities

Solidarity and justice

 

Implications for social justice

Equal access to:

Wealth

Health

Well-being

Justice

Privileges, and

Opportunity regardless of legal, political, or economic differences

Education

Personal liberty

Appreciation of diversity in the communities

Future vision

Labor in the streets inviting and serving hose who have been left out to know and experience the tremendous and abundant love of God through Jesus Christ

Commitment to break down walls of division that keep sisters and brothers separated from one another, excluded, or rendered disposable by the society

Resolve to build bridges of hope, mercy, and justice toward creation of a culture of communal care responsive to the cries of those who are poor.

Provision of help with immigration legal services, such as citizenship application assistance and assist government-approved refugees to become self-sufficient through essential skills.

Statistics

By 2018, there were a record of 44.8 million immigrants living in the United Sates, making up 13.7% of the nation’s population

More than half (54%) of all immigrant children of Hispanic origin in 2017, compared with 14% of non-immigrant children.

Most of the children live under poverty

 

Source: https://www.childtrends.org/indicators/immigrant-children#:~:text=More%20than%20half%20(54%20percent,percent%20of%20non%2Dimmigrant%20children.

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Analysis of the selected organization

Latino immigrants make up 47% of the foreign-born population and by 2020, 30% of all U.S. children were children of immigrants.

Cultural norms and values that emphasize family responsibilities, warmth, and reciprocity (familismo) as well as close bonds with others (personalismo) in Latino communities may provide Latino immigrant children with a wealth of high-quality relationships with immediate and extended family and friends, which can serve as a buffer against the negative effects of poverty (Lansdale, Hardie, Oropesa, & Hillemeier, 2015).

Children from Latino immigrant communities are more likely to grow up in two-parent homes, which benefits their educational outcomes.

Immigrant children are 1.5 times more likely to end up impoverished than children born in the United States; 26% live in a linguistically segregated home, where no one speaks English fluently (Hernandez & Napierala, 2012).

Through charity, however, the Latino immigrant children have significantly settled in several homes and turned out to be among the workforce of the United States

 

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Services they offer

Help completing forms

Filings with USCIS

Representation at Asylum Interviews

Representation before the Immigration Court

Representation before the Board of Immigration Appeals

Naturalization, relative requests, work authorization, temporary asylum and immigration applications, petitions for battered and abusive wives and infants, and more are among the services provided by Catholic Charities’ attorneys and paralegals to refugees, whether registered or illegal, newcomers or lifelong residents (James, 2019).

 

Government law that supports the organization

The Immigration and Nationality Act is the body of legislation that governs existing immigration policy (INA).

The INA requires the US to issue up to 675,000 permanent immigrant visas each year in a variety of categories. In addition to those 675,000 visas, the INA allows U.S. residents’ partners, guardians, and children under the age of 21 to enter the country at any time (Bradford, 2019).

Conclusion

The Archdiocese of Miami is one of the catholic charities whose mission is to honor God by enhancing human life and dignity, supporting individuals and families, building communities, and working for justice.

The organization sees Latino immigrant children as some of the most disadvantaged people in society, and aims to support them as a means of improving society.

The number of Latino immigrant children has expanded rapidly with factors affecting their health multiple and interlinked.

The children are often considered at increased risk of maltreatment because of stress, and pressure experienced by the family resulting from immigration and acculturation.

The immigrant children undergo oppression but the charity fosters ethnic-social construction as a way of integrating them in the societal values.

Latino immigrants make up 47% of the foreign-born population and by 2020, 30% of all U.S. children were children of immigrants.

By 2018, there were a record of 44.8 million immigrants living in the United Sates, making up 13.7% of the nation’s population

With The INA in place, the charity advocates for policies that uphold human dignity and promote integral human development

 

 

References

Lansdale, N. S., Hardie, J. H., Oropesa, R. S., & Hillemeier, M. M. (2015). Behavioral functioning among Mexican-origin children: Does legal status matter? Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 56(1), 2–18. doi:10.1177/0022146514567896

Hernandez, D. J., & Napierala, J. S. (2012). Children in immigrant families: Essential to America’s future. New York, NY: Foundation for Child Development

Bradford, A. C. (2016). ” Let the Cuban Community Aid its Haitian Brothers”: Monsignor Bryan Walsh, Miami’s Immigrant Church, and the Making of a Multiethnic City, 1960–2000. US Catholic Historian, 34(3), 99-126.

Kammer, Fred, Sjsue Weishar, Philip J. Williams, Ann Cass Williams PJ Edwards, Michael Mata, Alexia Salvatierra, and Msgr Dan Stack. “Recovering the human face of immigration in the US South.” (2017).

James, E. C. (Ed.). (2019). Governing Gifts: Faith, Charity, and the Security State. University of New Mexico Press.

Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Miami, Inc. (2021). Ccadm.org. https://www.ccadm.org/