Los Angeles Bid For The 2024 Summer Olympics

Knowing what you know about the Bid process, the operations of the event itself and legacies, please provide advice and insights for an American city who is considering on bidding on an Olympic games. What to expect and what to consider if they are going to bid and what it will take to host and what it will take to win the bid.(I choose Los Angeles bid for the 2024 Summer Olympics) 

The response requires at minimum three typed pages with 1 ½ spacing and 12 pt Times Roman font.  Please do not demonstrate comprehension use your space to apply that theory and concepts. 

The Olympic Game Bid Process

www.gamesbid.com

Why would we do it? And who is we?

Who all has to be involved? Brainstorm

  • Start here!

Stages

  • The Bid
  • The Campaign
  • The Vote
  • The Planning
  • The Hosting
  • The Legacy

The Bid

Pre Application Stage

  • Host City Notifies NOC of interest
  • Selection process within the country organized by NOC (e.g. USA)
  • NOC notifies IOC of interest in bidding
  • Done Nine years Out
  • NOC pays application fee
  • NOC receives materials to assist in planning the bid

Criteria for Candidate Acceptance by IOC

  • I. Introduction
  • Motivation, Concept and Public Opinion
  • II. Political Support
  • Govt, NOC, City,
  • Committee
  • Legal Aspects
  • III. Finance
  • Budget
  • Contributions
  • OCOG Revenue Generation
  • IV. Venues
  • Competition Existing, planned, additional
  • Non competition
  • V. Accommodations
  • Hotels
  • Media
  • VI. Transport Infrastructure

Existing, Planned Additional

  • VII. General Conditions and Logistics
  • Dates
  • Population
  • Meteorology
  • Environment
  • Experience
  • Security
  • Appendices

Applicant Cities

Thirteen years out: IOC invited the National Olympic Committees (NOCs) of the world to nominate cities in their territories to be Applicant Cities for the Games.

Thirteen years out, the IOC announces cities proposed by their NOCs.

These cities all responded to the IOC’s Applicant City Questionnaire, which was then studied by an IOC working group before a report was submitted to the IOC Executive Board.

Candidate Cities


Twelve years outs the IOC Executive Board selected cities to become Candidate Cities and to continue to the next part of the bid process.

Eleven years out, the cities submitt their candidature files to the IOC, which were based upon the 17 themes of the IOC’s Candidature Procedure and Questionnaire. These files form the basis of each city’s bid for the Games.

The Campaign

Communicate Why You Want the Bid

Being a Part of the International Community

Evaluation Commission

Briefing of IOC Members

  • A technical briefing for IOC members with the Candidate Cities was held in Lausanne.
  • This meeting came out of the IOC’s evaluation process of previous bid procedures, where it was felt that another opportunity to present the technical elements of a bid to the IOC members would be appreciated by all involved.
  • A technical briefing from each city, followed by a second day for members to ask any follow-up questions they may have had.

IOC Session


The culmination of the bid process is meeting of the 121st IOC Session in Copenhagen.

The cities will each have 45 minutes to make a presentation to the Session, followed by 15 minutes for questions.

The cities will present in the order of drawing of lots, as performed by the IOC Executive Board in December 2007.

Following the presentations by the cities, Nawal El Moutawakel will present the report of the Evaluation Commission to the Session.

The Vote


The eligible IOC members will then be asked to vote. In each round; each participating IOC member may vote for only one city.

If, after the first round of voting, no city obtains the absolute majority of the votes cast, as many rounds are held as necessary for a city to obtain such majority. The city receiving the least number of votes leaves the competition.

The name of the city is made public straight away and the vote continues. If only two cities remain in contention, the one that obtains the greatest number of votes is declared elected.

The announcement of the winning city is then communicated by the IOC President at the announcement ceremony, following which, the newly elected NOC and city will sign the Host City Contract.

Rules and Limitations

Final Bid Document

  • Volume One
  • National, Regional Candidate City characteristics
  • Legal Aspects
  • Customs and Immigration Formalities
  • Environmental Protection and Meterology
  • Finance
  • Marketing

Final Bid Document

  • Volume Two
  • General Sports Concept
  • Sports
  • Paralympics Games
  • Olympic Village

Volume Three

  • Medical/Health Services
  • Security
  • Accommodation
  • Transport
  • Technology
  • Communication and media Services
  • Olympism
  • Guarantees

The OCOG

Role of Organizing Committee

  • Entrusted by IOC and NOC to organize and host Olympic Games
  • Life Cycle
  • Created to submit Bid
  • Empowered if Awarded Bid, dissolves if it loses bid
  • Grows in staff and budget
  • Disbands after the game
  • From time it is constituted to dissolved reports to IOC.
  • Private Entity vs Governmental Agency
  • Varies based on form of Government and NOC

Marketing Objectives of OCOG

  • Enhance Image
  • City Brand
  • View of city after the games
  • Games Brand
  • What is associated with Munich?
  • What is associated with Montreal?
  • What is associated with LA?
  • What is associated with Atlanta?

Associations

  • Mascot
  • Culture
  • Event Itself
  • Maximize Profit
  • Guarantee exclusiveness for sponsors
  • Protection against Ambush Marketing
  • Offering Sponsor Packages

Conceptual Framework for International Event

Antecedents

Brand Equity

Consequences

Product Related

Event/Sport

Athletes

Teams

Reputation/Traditions

Facilities

Total

Package

Organization Related

Market Related

Media Exposure

Location

City/Country

Community Support

Loyalty

Visibility

Attendance

Community

Support

Viewership

Corporate

Sponsorship

Atmosphere

Brand

Awareness

Brand

Associations

Perceived

Quality

Marketplace

Perception